ENT Services

Ear

Cochlear Implant

A cochlear implant is an electronic medical device that replaces the function of the damaged inner ear. Unlike hearing aids, which make sounds louder, cochlear implants do the work of damaged parts of the inner ear (cochlea) to provide sound signals to the brain.

Cysts and Tumors (Cholesteatoma)

A cholesteatoma is an abnormal, noncancerous skin growth that can develop in the middle section of your ear, behind the eardrum. It may be a birth defect, but it’s most commonly caused by repeated middle ear infections.

Ear Drum Perforations

A hole or rupture in the eardrum, a thin membrane that separates the ear canal and the middle ear, is called a perforated eardrum. The medical term for eardrum is tympanic membrane. The middle ear is connected to the nose by the Eustachian tube, which equalizes pressure in the middle ear.

Hearing Aids

A hearing aid is a device designed to improve hearing by making sound audible to a person with hearing loss. Hearing aids are classified as medical devices in most countries, and regulated by the respective regulations. Small audio amplifiers such as PSAPs or other plain sound reinforcing systems cannot be sold as "hearing aids".

Hearing Loss

The sooner steps are taken to manage hearing loss, the easier it will be to determine a solution. Our ability to hear is centered in the brain, and the longer it is deprived of certain sounds, the harder it will be to retrain the brain to hear these sounds later. Hearing aids can prevent or reduce the impact of this deterioration.

Meniere's Disease

Meniere's disease is a disorder of the inner ear that causes episodes in which you feel as if you're spinning (vertigo), and you have fluctuating hearing loss with a progressive, ultimately permanent loss of hearing, ringing in the ear (tinnitus), and sometimes a feeling of fullness or pressure in your ear. In most cases, Meniere's disease affects only one ear.

Middle Ear Fluid

Otitis media with effusion (OME) is inflammation and fluid buildup (effusion) in the middle ear without bacterial or viral infection. This may occur because the fluid buildup persists after an ear infection has resolved. It may also occur because of some dysfunction or noninfectious blockage of the eustachian tubes.

Recurrent Ear Infections

Otitis media with effusion (OME) is inflammation and fluid buildup (effusion) in the middle ear without bacterial or viral infection. This may occur because the fluid buildup persists after an ear infection has resolved. It may also occur because of some dysfunction or noninfectious blockage of the eustachian tubes.

Skin Cancers

Skin cancer is a common and locally destructive cancerous (malignant) growth of the skin. It originates from the cells that line up along the membrane that separates the superficial layer of skin from the deeper layers. Unlike cutaneous malignant melanoma, the vast majority of these sorts of skin cancers have a limited potential to spread to other parts of the body (metastasize) and become life-threatening.


Nose and Sinus

Allergies

Allergies, also known as allergic diseases, are a number of conditions caused by hypersensitivity of the immune system to something in the environment that usually causes little or no problem in most people. These diseases include hay fever, food allergies, atopic dermatitis, allergic asthma, and anaphylaxis.

Epistaxis

Epistaxis is defined as bleeding from the nostril, nasal cavity, or nasopharynx. Nosebleeds are due to the bursting of a blood vessel within the nose. This may be spontaneous or caused by trauma. Nosebleeds are rarely life threatening and usually stop on their own. Nosebleeds can be divided into 2 categories, based on the site of bleeding: anterior (in the front of the nose) or posterior (in the back of the nose).

Nasal Obstruction

Nasal obstruction refers to some blockage of the nose or nasal cavity and can be caused by a wide variety of problems. Our experts perform nasal examination with lighted scopes and may use imaging, including CT scans and MRIs, when necessary. We may recommend an allergy evaluation.

Nasal Polyps

Nasal polyps are soft, painless, noncancerous growths on the lining of your nasal passages or sinuses. They hang down like teardrops or grapes. They result from chronic inflammation due to asthma, recurring infection, allergies, drug sensitivity or certain immune disorders.

Nasal Septal Deviation

A deviated septum is a condition in which the nasal septum -- the bone and cartilage that divide the nasal cavity of the nose in half -- is significantly off center, or crooked, making breathing difficult. Most people have some sort of imbalance in the size of their breathing passages. In fact, estimates indicate that 80% of people, most unknowingly, have some sort of misalignment to their nasal septum. Only the more severe imbalances cause significant breathing problems and require treatment.

Recurrent Sinus Infections

Chronic sinusitis is a common condition in which the cavities around nasal passages (sinuses) become inflamed and swollen for at least 12 weeks, despite treatment attempts.


Throat

Hoarseness

Hoarseness is a symptom and not a disease. It is a general term that describes abnormal voice changes. When hoarse, the voice may sound breathy, raspy, strained, or there may be changes in volume (loudness) or pitch (how high or low the voice is).

Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Obstructive sleep apnea is seen in all age groups, but the frequency increases with age and obesity. Symptoms include snoring and daytime sleepiness. Weight loss, sleeping on one's side, and decreasing alcohol consumption can help. The delivery of pressure via a face or nasal mask (CPAP) is often prescribed. Other common treatments include an oral device and surgery.

Recurrent Sore Throats

A sore throat is pain, scratchiness or irritation of the throat that often worsens when you swallow. The most common cause of a sore throat (pharyngitis) is a viral infection, such as a cold or the flu. A sore throat caused by a virus resolves on its own.

Swallowing Problems

Difficulty swallowing is also called dysphagia. It is usually a sign of a problem with your throat or esophagus the muscular tube that moves food and liquids from the back of your mouth to your stomach. Although dysphagia can happen to anyone, it is most common in older adults, babies, and people who have problems of the brain or nervous system.

Throat cancer

Cancer is a class of diseases in which abnormal cells multiply and divide uncontrollably in the body. These abnormal cells form malignant growths called tumors. Throat cancer refers to cancer of the voice box, the vocal cords, and other parts of the throat, such as the tonsils and oropharynx.

Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy

A tonsillectomy is a surgical procedure to remove the tonsils. Tonsils are two small glands located in the back of your throat. Tonsils house white blood cells to help you fight infection, but sometimes the tonsils themselves become infected.

Tumors of the Voice Box

Laryngeal cancer is not as well known by the general public as some other types of cancer, yet it is not a rare disease. Development of laryngeal cancer is a process that involves many factors, but approximately 90 percent of head and neck cancers occur after exposure to known carcinogens (cancer causing substances).

Vocal Cord Paralysis

Vocal fold (or cord) paresis and paralysis result from abnormal nerve input to the voice box muscles (laryngeal muscles). Paralysis is the total interruption of nerve impulse, resulting in no movement; paresis is the partial interruption of nerve impulse, resulting in weak or abnormal motion of laryngeal muscles.

Vocal Nodules

Your vocal folds are inside your larynx, or voice box. When you talk, air moves from your lungs through the vocal folds to your mouth. The vocal folds vibrate to produce sound. Anything that makes it harder for the vocal folds to vibrate can cause a voice problem.

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Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Monday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am-1:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Allergy Office Hours

Monday:

8:30 am-11:30 am

1:00 pm-4:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:30 am-11:30 am

1:00 pm-4:00 pm

Wednesday:

Closed

Thursday:

8:30 am-11:30 am

1:00 pm-4:00 pm

Friday:

8:30 am-11:30 am

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

  • "I see Dr. Stiles. He is the nicest, most attentive doctor I've ever seen. The staff is genuinely nice, and very fast. There are 3 doctors in the office. They also have a allergy center. I recommend this office every chance I get. They're awesome!"
    Tabitha L. - Smiths, AL